Paprika potato wedges

Paprika potato wedges

  • Servings: 3
  • Difficulty: easy
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Crunchy, fragrant Paprika baked potato wedges from plot to plate.

Comment below if you think these potato wedges are shop bought or homemade?

I was absolutely amazed at how well these came out, and I’m definitely going to make them again soon to make sure it’s not a fluke.

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Minted potato salad

Minted potato salad

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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An easy potato salad recipe with only 4 ingredients

BBQ season is well and truly underway and this is the last potato salad recipe you’ll ever need…Probably…

This is a great way to use up tiny, marble like potatoes that you often find when you dig up potatoes – otherwise known as Fingerlings.

This really is one of those recipes that you adjust to suit your own tastes, so if you require more mint, simple add some more to the sauce, and likewise with the salad creme and mayonnaise.

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Sunday Night Supper Club with Nicky Patrick at BBC Surrey

You may have remembered that not so long ago we were invited by Nicky Patrick to join her at BBC Surrey for her Sunday Night Supper club. Well, this week we were invited back.

We spoke about cooking lasagne with fresh pasta, Spanish chicken bake, salads and what we would cook if we were on Come Dine With Me.

Sit back and enjoy!

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Growing mint indoors infographic

A few days ago I published an infographic from Sainsbury’s Money Matters about how to grow strawberries at home. This infographic is all about to grow in your own home. Mint has to be one of my favourite herbs of all time. When grown indoors, mint will last all year round and can be used for so many things. This video for example, shows you how to make your own mint tea.

Mint can be used to spruce up potatoes, peas and I’ve even seen it being used in jelly! Sainsbury’s Money Matters has this helpful info-graphic with advice on how to grow mint in a flat or apartment – they’ve also sent me a kit to use in my flat to help me get going!

I hope you find this as useful as I have!

Picking Champagne Rhubarb

Instagram and Twitter has been awash this bank holiday weekend with photos of people picking rhubarb and making all kinds of lovely sweet treats with it.  Picking rhubarb gives you a real sense that spring has settled in nicely and summer is truly on the way.  I tried earlier this to force my rhubarb in a strange looking frame, which got blown away by the wind the rain – so in the end, I just left it to do what it was supposed to do on its own.  I can’t say that this has done any harm to my crop as I’ve got a glutton of rhubarb to harvest.

It’s not advised that you cut rhubarb stems, the reason being is that once cut, the base of the stem will die and rot into the plant, which is as good as it sounds.   When harvesting rhubarb you want to be sure to pull stems out of the crown of the plant.

Reach as far down along the stem, into the root, as possible and pull a stalk in the same direction in which it’s growing.  You’ll know when you’ve done it right because of the sound – you’ll hear a nice, light, suctioned crunch – if you hear a snap, you may have broken it off at the root (this isn’t the end of the world, and you may accidently do this as I have done on occasion, so try not to lose too much sleep over this!)

You should end up with a nice clean stalk like the one below.

 

I’ve seen people cut rhubarb at differing lengths all over the internet, and I’m sure each variety and each grower has their own personal preference, but personally – I like to cut off the stalk about 2 or 3 inches from the leaf, or when the colour starts to change along the stem.

Can’t wait to make some jam with this and show you the recipe!